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Temporary Work Leave: Knowing the Different Types of Benefits

Paid vacation and sick days aren’t required by law. Employers offer these as benefits for employees, and they allow them to attract more qualified candidates when hiring. These benefits improve employee morale and satisfaction, which leads to longer retention rates and a reduction in hiring costs. Paid vacation and sick leave are agreements that are established between businesses and their employees. 

Workplace handbooks include details […]
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Work Breaks: Paid or Not?

Federal law does not require an employer to offer lunch or coffee breaks. However, if an employer starts offering these breaks, then there are certain legal requirements. Paid Work Breaks If an employer offers a work break that is under 30 minutes, then federal law considers the breaks as compensable. This means that the  employer must pay the employee for the time spent taking a […]
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Maintaining Employee Files: What should be included?

Although employers should maintain files on all employees, not every document related to the employee should be kept in the basic personnel file. A basic personnel file should include documents such as: Recruiting and screening documents. Job descriptions. Records relating to job offers, promotion, demotion, transfer, and layoff. Education and training records. Pay and compensation information. IRS W-4 Forms. Employment contracts. Handbook acknowledgement. Employee benefits. […]
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Texas Judge Stops Obama’s Salary Increase

On November 22, 2016, Judge Mazzant of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Texas issued a nationwide preliminary injunction to stop the Department of Labor’s (“DOL”) new regulation to increase the minimum salary for exempt employees from $455 per week (or $23,660 per year) to $913 per week (or $47,476 per year). This regulation is referred to as white collar exemptions. […]
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Update – Texas Judge Stops Obama’s Salary Increase!

As we previously reported, on November 22, 2016, U.S. District Court Judge Amos Mazzant granted an Emergency Motion for Preliminary Injunction and thereby enjoined the Department of Labor from implementing and enforcing the Overtime Final Rule that was scheduled to take effect on December 1, 2016. On December 1, 2016, the Department of Justice on behalf of the Department of Labor filed a notice to […]
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Tips for Responding to an EEOC Charge

When you receive a charge of discrimination from the EEOC (Equal Employment Opportunity Commission), it is important to take certain steps before responding: Notify Legal Counsel  – Ensure that legal counsel is immediately notified of the EEOC charge of discrimination.  A charge of discrimination is actually a legal claim against your company so the appropriate defense must be developed. Collect all relevant documents  – The […]
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TIMELINE UPDATE – TEXAS JUDGE STOPS OBAMA’S SALARY INCREASE

As reported in our Blog last month (http://yorkbowmanlaw.com/update-texas-judge-stops-obamas-salary-increase), a Texas federal court granted a preliminary nationwide injunction to stop the DOL’s overtime rule that was scheduled to take effect on December 1, 2016. In response, the DOL filed an appeal. As many of you know, the appeal process can take months. To avoid the lengthy process, Labor Secretary Thomas Perez filed a motion for an […]
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Understand Your Severance Agreement Before You Sign It  

Your employer has given you a severance agreement and asked you to sign on the dotted line. As you read the severance agreement, you are happy your employer is offering to pay your salary for six months, along with your health care benefits. However, the severance agreement contains a lot of legal language that you don’t quite understand.  Before you sign the severance agreement, make […]
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